PFAS

NRWA PFAS Cost Recovery Program

How can I sign up for the program?

There is no cost your utility systems to register for the program. Registration makes your system eligible to recover current and future costs. Systems that register will be eligible to recover costs associated with PFAS testing, treatment, and remediation if a settlement is reached.

What is the NRWA PFAS Cost Recovery Program?

To better serve State Associations and their member utilities negatively impacted or potentially negatively impacted by PFAS contamination and other water pollutants, and related current and future State and Federal regulations, NRWA agreed to undertake a campaign, the PFAS Cost Recovery Program, to work with State Associations to actively educate their water and wastewater utilities about these PFAS contamination issues as well as to encourage them to join the NRWA PFAS Cost Recovery Program by retaining Napoli Shkolnik PLLC for participation in the current Multi District Litigation (MDL) proceeding in the Federal District Court for South Carolina (MDL 2873) as well as any other appropriate action in State and Federal Court.

Is Your State or System Being Affected by PFAS?

What is PFAS?

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are a group of man-made chemicals that includes PFOA, PFOS, GenX, and many other chemicals. PFAS have been manufactured and used in a variety of industries around the globe, including in the United States since the 1940s. PFOA and PFOS have been the most extensively produced and studied of these chemicals. Both chemicals are very persistent in the environment and in the human body – meaning they don’t break down and they can accumulate over time. There is evidence that exposure to PFAS can lead to adverse human health effects.

What are the health effects of PFAS?

Studies have shown an association between increased PFOA and PFOS blood levels and an increased risk for several health effects, including effects on the liver and the immune system, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, thyroid disorders, pregnancy-induced hypertension and preeclampsia, and cancer (testicular and kidney).

Where can PFAS be found?

PFAS Sources
Source: Healthy Indoors

PFAS may be in drinking water, food, indoor dust, some consumer products, and workplaces. Blood serum concentrations of PFASs are higher in workers and individuals living near facilities that use or produce PFASs than for the general population. Pathways of exposure include ingestion of food and water, use of consumer products or inhalation of PFAS-containing particulate matter (e.g., soils and dust) or vapor phase precursors.

What can we do about it?

The National Rural Water Association (NRWA) has joined with the law office of Napoli Shkolnik PLLC to bring together utility systems from across the country that have concerns or have been affected by PFAS contamination. This potential landmark contamination case could help water and wastewater systems recoup money spent on treatment and remediation.

Napoli Shkolnik will represent clients in any state who are dealing with contamination of public water supplies.

Resources

PFAS Press ReleaseLearn More
Human Health Toxicity Assessments for GenX ChemicalsLearn More
National PFAS Testing StrategyLearn More
PFAS Strategic Roadmap: EPA’s Commitments to Action 2021-2024Learn More
PFAS ExplainedLearn More
Drinking Water Health Advisories for PFAS Fact Sheet for CommunitiesLearn More